Programs

The following are two hour programs created to be presented to a single class. They are suited for grades 2nd through 5th grades.

Lesson Title – Flute’s Journey – Making a Promise of Good Stewardship

Students will listen to the story of Flute’s Journey and discuss the many environmental hazards faced by the migrating Wood Thrush. They will think about what they can do to be a good steward for migrating birds and make a personal promise that will be written on a peace bird that they create. The birds will be displayed on a tree limb in the classroom.

Art and Academic Curricular Standards Addressed:

  • Understand animal life cycles.
  • Understand characteristics of various environments and behaviors of humans that enable plants and animals to survive.
  • Identify physical characteristics (head, tail, eyes, ears, nose, mouth, legs, paws, beak, feathers, fur) in a variety of animals.
  • Create original art that expresses ideas about people, neighborhoods, or communities.
  • Understand the “story” in works of art.
  • Understand characteristics of the Elements of Art, including lines, shapes, colors, textures, form, space, and value.
  • Create art from real and imaginary sources of inspiration.
  • Use a variety of tools safely and appropriately to create art.
  • Use the processes of drawing, painting, weaving, printing, stitchery, collage, mixed media, sculpture, and ceramics to create art.

Lesson Title – The First Flute and the Heartbeat Drum – Good Vibrations!

Students will listen to Native American stories about the first flute and the heartbeat drum. They will explore the importance of music and how vibrations work in the creation of sound. Students will view a simple experiment to understand vibrations and create their own spirit drum.

Art and Academic Curricular Standards Addressed:

  • Create original art that expresses ideas about people, neighborhoods, or communities.
  • Understand the “story” in works of art.
  • Understand characteristics of the Elements of Art, including lines, shapes, colors, textures, form, space, and value.
  • Create art from real and imaginary sources of inspiration.
  • Use a variety of tools safely and appropriately to create art.
  • Use the processes of drawing, painting, weaving, printing, stitchery, collage, mixed media, sculpture, and ceramics to create art.
  • Illustrate how sound is produced by vibrating objects and columns of air.
  • Summarize the relationship between sound and objects of the body that vibrate – eardrum and vocal cords.

Lesson Title – Wind, Rain, Clouds, Oh My!

Students will explore wind and clouds and their relationship with weather, the environment, and people through listening to three Native American stories, playing a game, kinesthetically acting out a rain storm, and through the performance of a short play.

Art and Academic Curricular Standards Addressed:

  • Compare weather patterns that occur over time and relateobservable patterns to time of day and time of year
  • Interpret stories from previously-read texts by acting them out.
  • Understand how the use of costumes, props, and masksenhance dramatic play.
  • Create art from real and imaginary sources of inspiration.
  • Use the processes of drawing, painting, weaving, printing,stitchery, collage, mixed media, sculpture, and ceramics tocreate art.
  • Give examples of ways in which people depend on thephysical environment and natural resources to meet basicneeds.

 

Lesson Title – The Story in Our Stars

Students will learn about stars and star constellations through the myth of Perseus, and will create their own 3D origami star.

Art and Academic Curricular Standards Addressed:

  • Recognize that the earth is part of a system called the solar system that includes the sun (a star), planets, and many moons and the earth is the third planet from the sun in our solar system.
  • Create art using the processes of drawing, painting, weaving, printing, stitchery, collage, mixed media, sculpture, ceramics, and current technology.
  • Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures; determine the central message, lesson, or moral and explain how it is conveyed through key details in the text.
  • Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.
  • Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 3 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
  • Ask and answer questions about information from a speaker, offering appropriate elaboration and detail.

Lesson Title – Sign of the Seahorse

Students will learn about life on coral reefs and problems that face the reefs through listening to the story The Sign of the Seahorse, exploring the vivid illustrations of the story, and creating their own coral reef using fiber materials.

Art and Academic Curricular Standards Addressed:

  • Integrate and evaluate information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.
  • Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.
  • Students know that there are bodies of water on the surface of the earth and that they are often named based on their characteristics and location. Some bodies of water are salty, some are ‘fresh’, some are ‘brackish’, and some are frozen in ice sheets and glaciers. Different types of organisms have developed to live in these different bodies and types of water.
  • Create art through a process that includes generating ideas, planning solutions, and producing original art.
  • Create art using the processes of drawing, painting, weaving, printing, stitchery, collage, mixed media, sculpture, ceramics, and current technology.

Lesson Title – Leaf Love

Students will listen to several Native American stories concerning plants. They will act out “Thanks to the Trees.” They will explore leaves from various trees and use those leaves to create a nature print. They will create a tree poem in the shape of a tree using words that describe the parts of a tree. They will also learn a song to celebrate the circle of life.

Art and Academic Curricular Standards Addressed:

  • Understand how plants survive in their environments.
  • Remember the function of the following structures as it relates to the survival of plants in their environments: • Roots – absorb nutrients • Stems – provide support • Leaves – synthesize food • Flowers – attract pollinators and produce seeds for reproduction
  • Explain how environmental conditions determine how well plants survive and grow.
  • Summarize the distinct stages of the life cycle of seed plants.
  • Explain how the basic properties (texture and capacity to hold water) and components (sand, clay and humus) of soil determine the ability of soil to support the growth and survival of many plants.
  • Create art through a process that includes generating ideas, planning solutions, and producing original art.
  • Create art using the processes of drawing, painting, weaving, printing, stitchery, collage, mixed media, sculpture, ceramics, and current technology.

Lesson Title – How Chipmunk Got His Stripes

Students will listen to “How Chipmunk Got His Stripes” and then discuss the life cycles demonstrated in the story. Students will create felt puppets of the bear and the chipmunk. In pairs, students will make up stories about what might come next for bear and chipmunk. They will create a story map for their story and then share their puppet story with the class.

Art and Academic Curricular Standards Addressed:

  • Understand animal life cycles. Understand characteristics of animals
  • Compare characteristics of animals
  • Summarize the life cycle of animals: Birth; Developing into an adult; Reproducing; Aging and death.
  • Compare life cycles of different animals such as, but not limited to, mealworms,
  • ladybugs, crickets, guppies or frogs.
  • Identify physical characteristics (head, tail, eyes, ears, nose, mouth, legs, paws, beak, feathers, fur) in a variety of animals.
  • Compare a variety of animals to determine how they are alike and different (i.e., dog—bark, four legs, tail; cat—meow, four legs, tail; soft/hard, big/little).
  • Students will  know that animals experience a cycle of life which begins with birth, then a period of time in which the animal develops into an adult. At adulthood, animals reproduce in order to sustain their species. In nature, all animals are programmed to age and eventually die. The details of the life cycle are different for specific animals.
  • Students know that different animals spend varying periods of time in each stage of the life cycle and that some animals have few stages, while others have several. Students know that animals might look the same, similar, or completely different at specific stages of development. Students know that animals may have varied needs at different stages of development, and may occupy unique habitats according to these needs.

The Following are one hour programs designed to be shared with a single class at a time.

Exploring Courage

Through the story of Courageous Clare storyteller Sherry Lovett will explore with students the stories we tell ourselves. Some stories like, I’m not good enough, math is too hard for me… can hurt us. While stories like, I can do anything, I am strong… can help us.  We will explore the concept of courage and the many forms it takes and how it can help us live the life we want. Discussion, poetry, and creating a personal chant will all be a part of  ​the journey. (Suitable for grades 4 – 6)

Heritage Stories: Folk and Personal

Storyteller Sherry Lovett will tell a folktale and a personal story as examples of heritage stories, and teach about the differences and why both are important. Students will look at the structure of stories and create a visual story map. They will tell one of their family stories or a folk tale that has been passed down to them. (Suitable for grades 5 – 8)​

Paws and Hands Together: Promoting Compassionate Communities for Animals

Students will listen to the story of Stubby, a WWI hero dog and a story about the everyday heroes of animal shelter workers. Students will “paws” to think about how humans and animals are alike and different, using a Venn diagram to compare them. Next the class will discuss what they can do to give animals a “hand.” Finally, students will create their own dog puppet to take home.  (Suitable for grades 1 – 3)

Assembly Programs Suitable for 20 – 200 Students:

How Stories Travel

Stories and songs can tell us a lot about who we are and where we come from. Travel back in time through the stories our ancestors told and follow them as they make their way to your own backyard. ​(30 minute program for PreK – 2nd)​

Traveling Across NC

Take a trip across North Carolina through Stories and songs that celebrate the diversity and heritage of the Tar Heel state. (30 – 40 minute program for 3rd – 6th)​

Environmental Stories

What does it mean to be a good steward of the earth? Explore this question through a variety of Native American stories and songs that show us the way. (30 – 40 minute program for 3rd – 6th)​

Adventures

From the adventures of the mighty Perseus to the silly antics of Glooskap, heroes all have their stories, and through their stories, we can join them on their journey.  There’s sure to be laughter and surprise, and lots of fun along the way. And, who knows, maybe in the end, you’ll see the hero in you. (30 – 40 minute program for 3rd – 6th)​

Wonder Stories

Did you ever wonder what really makes a person happy, or how to out-smart a dragon, or how to be smarter? Stories guide the way and inspire thinking and laughter as you go! (30 – 40 minute program for 3rd – 6th)​

Appalachian Arts

Appalachian stories and ballads arrived with the Scot-Irish immigrants who settled in the area. Their ballads from the Old Country became known here as the “love songs” and “Jack in the Beanstalk” became the quintessential mountain Jack stories and they are still as mesmerizing, entertaining, and delightful as they were to our ancestors. (30 – 40 minute program for 3rd – 6th)​